BBC Sports Personality of the Year Award honours: “an ordinary woman who fought with a mother’s love for what she believed was right and simply refused to give up”

Anne Williams at the Hillsborough Memorial Service at Anfield

Anne Williams at the Hillsborough Memorial Service at Anfield

Anne Williams, whose fifteen year old son Kevin was killed in the Hillsborough Disaster of 1989, has been honoured by the BBC at the Sports Personality of the Year Awards. Anne, who campaigned tirelessly on behalf of her son alongside the families of the 95 others who died at Hillsborough, passed away three days after the 24th memorial service at Anfield in April this year. She was awarded the Helen Rollason award for outstanding achievement in the face of adversity. The Liverpool Echo reports:

Having lost her beloved 15-old-son Kevin in 1989, Anne was at the forefront of those challenging the original inquest verdicts for many years, refusing to give up on the fight for justice despite seeing three memorials to the Attorney General and a petition to the European Court of Human Rights all rejected.

Her tireless campaigning, along with new evidence she uncovered, helped lead to the formation of the Hillsborough Independent Panel and, though she received her terminal diagnosis just six weeks after their historic report of September 2012, she was in attendance at the High Court last December to see the accidental death verdicts quashed and new inquests, set to begin next March, ordered.

LACUNA’s first issue: “On Protest”  to be published in February 2014, features an interview with the Chief Civil Servant to the Hillsborough Independent Panel Report. The publication of this report finally vindicated the victims of the Hillsborough disaster and brought to light previously unseen documents which implicated South Yorkshire Police, amongst others, in the disaster and subsequent cover-up. To read more about this story, and find out what it takes to bring about effective change through protest subscribe to our mailing list , like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Advertisements

What does it take to expose injustice in the face of systemic opposition?

Rebecca MunroMembers of the Lacuna team headed to the Home Office to find out. Researcher Rebecca Munro (pictured) met with  the Chief Civil Servant to the Hillsborough Independent Panel to discuss the mechanisms through which historic injustices can be brought to light. This meeting revealed some surprising and moving insights and is a must-read for anyone who wants to understand how protest can bring about change at the highest levels of government.

The feature based on this interview will be published in the first edition of Lacuna which launches in February 2014. To ensure you don’t miss out on this or any of our other original features follow us on Twitter and subscribe to our mailing list.

Police kept money collected from the dead and dying, Hillsborough Independent Panel reports

090415niphillsborough_3--123928584641526300Jonathan Owen, writing yesterday in the Independent, revealed that officers from South Yorkshire Police Force paid cash found at the Hillsborough stadium into the forces’ finance department, rather than donate it to a fund set up for victims of the disaster. These revelations are particularly distressing in view of allegations made by officers at the time of the disaster, who accused Liverpool fans of robbing from the dead at Hillsborough. This revelation is the latest in a series that have emerged as part of the inquiry into Hillsborough, an inquiry which only took place as a result of decades of tireless campaigning on the part of relatives of the victims.

The first issue of LACUNA will focus on Protest, and aims to examine this topic from a variety of perspectives. What motivates people to continue to protest even when doing so comes at great personal cost? What can protest achieve? How do you protest effectively? These are some of the questions which LACUNA hopes to address.